Deaths after state preemption ::

By state, the number of people killed by dog breeds most often included in breed-specific laws after a legislature enacted a state preemption law barring local breed-specific ordinances.


Note: Deaths inflicted by wolf hybrids have been excluded because state laws pertaining to wolf-dog hybrids are about both dangerous dog breeds and keeping wild or exotic animals.

Arizona

2016 preemption law

In 2016, during Preemption Wave II (2012 to present), the Arizona legislature enacted a preemption law prohibiting local governments from enacting or enforcing breed-specific laws. Despite the newness of the state preemption law, a little boy has already been brutally killed by a breed of dog most likely to be included in local breed-specific ordinances. The state preemption law does not affect Indian reservations, which are free to implement breed-specific laws.

Arizona 2016 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
2017 Maricopa County Marcos Raya, Jr. 1 Rottweiler

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

California

1989 preemption law - 2005 partial repeal

In 1989, during Preemption Wave I (1988 to 1991), the California legislature enacted a state preemption law preventing local governments from enacting breed-specific laws. In 2005, it was partially repealed, allowing for the regulation of specific breeds via spay, neuter status, but does not allow a specific breed to be declared "potentially dangerous" or "vicious." Dog breeds most likely to be included in those types of ordinances have killed over 60 Californians since 1989.

California 1989 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
1989 Humboldt County Garrett East < 2 Pit bull
1990 Los Angeles County Lilly Marjee 70 Pit bull
1993 Tulare County Luis Hernandez 2 Pit bull
1994 Los Angeles County Baby "Doe" Garcia < 1 Pit bull
1995 Ventura County Jessica Hull < 1 Pit bull
1996 Alameda County John Young 8 Rottweiler
1997 Alameda County Andre Theriault < 1 Rottweiler
1997 Los Angeles County Kristine Castillo < 1 Rottweiler
1997 Nevada County John Doe 1 Rottweiler
1997 Tulare County Melba Adams 87 Rottweiler
1998 San Diego County Susan Meller 75 Rottweiler
1999 Los Angeles County Fily Araujo 1 Pit bull
1999 San Diego Shalen Cammon 3 Pit bull
2000 San Bernardino County Cash Carson 10 Pit bull
2001 San Francisco County Diane Whipple 33 Presa canario
2001 San Joaquin County James Dehoyos 2 Pit bull
2002 Monterrey County Victoria Morales 5 Rottweiler
2002 Tehama County Genoe Novak 6 Rottweiler
2003 Riverside County Somer Clugston 2 Pit bull
2003 San Bernardino County Jennifer Davis 7 Rottweiler
2004 Kern County Leta Ward 65 Rottweiler
2005 Fresno County Tyler Babcock 6 Pit bull
2005 Los Angeles County Cassandra Garcia 1 Rottweiler
2005 Los Angeles County Mike Gomez 86 Pit bull
2005 San Francisco County Nicholas Fabish 12 Pit bull
2006 Los Angeles County John Doe 25 Pit bull
2006 San Bernardino County Shaun McCafferty 27 Pit bull
2007 Placer County Cora Lee Suehead 61 Pit bull
2007 San Bernardino County Kelly Caldwell 45 Pit bull
2008 Riverside County Gerald Adelmund 60 Pit bull
2008 Ventura County Katya Todesco 5 Pit bull
2009 Merced County Colten Smith 1 Pit bull
2009 Riverside County Hill Williams 38 Mastiff
2010 Calaveras County Jerry Yates 69 Pit bull
2010 Contra Costa County Jacob Bisbee 2 Pit bull
2010 Riverside County Christina Casey 53 Pit bull
2010 Riverside County Edward Mitchelle 67 Pit bull
2010 San Bernardino County Omar Martinez 3 Pit bull
2010 San Bernardino County Nathan Aguirre 2 Pit bull
2011 Colusa County Linda Castillo 51 Pit bull
2011 San Bernardino County Jennie Erquiaga 47 Pit bull
2011 San Diego County Emako Mendoza 76 Pit bull
2011 San Mateo County Darla Napora 32 Pit bull
2012 Fresno County Esteban Alavez 34 Pit bull
2012 San Diego County Diane Jansen 59 Pit bull
2012 San Diego County Tyzhel McWilliams < 1 Pit bull
2012 San Diego County Remedios Romero-Solares 30 American bulldog
2013 Alameda County Nephi Selu 6 Pit bull
2013 Los Angeles County Pamela Devitt 63 Pit bull
2013 Riverside County Elsie Grace 91 Pit bull
2013 San Bernardino County Samuel Zamudio 2 Pit bull
2013 San Joaquin County Claudia Gallardo 38 Pit bull
2014 Riverside County Annabell Martin 89 Rottweiler
2014 Stanislaus County Juan Fernandez 54 Pit bull
2015 Butte County Maria Torres 57 Pit bull
2015 Riverside County Emilio Rios Sr. 65 Pit bull
2016 Fresno County Valente Aguirre 58 Pit bull
2016 Fresno County Susie Kirby < 1 Pit bull
2016 San Diego County Sebastian Caban < 1 Pit bull
2016 San Joaquin County Earl Stephens Jr. 43 Pit bull
2016 Yuba County Tyler Trammell-Huston 9 Pit bull
2017 Los Angeles County Valentine Herrera 76 Pit bull
2017 Stanislaus County Deborah Onsurez 56 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Connecticut

2013 preemption law

In 2013, during Preemption Wave II (2012 to present), the Connecticut legislature enacted a preemption law prohibiting local governments from enacting or enforcing breed-specific laws.1 Despite the newness of the state preemption law, two people have already been killed by breeds of dogs most likely to be included in local breed-specific ordinances. The death of Jocelyn Winfrey was so gruesome, one on scene witness said his only reference point was "Hannibal Lecter."

Connecticut 2013 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
2014 New Haven County Rita Pepe 93 Pit bull
2016 New Haven County Jocelyn Winfrey 53 American bulldog

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Florida

1990 grandfather preemption law

In 1990, during Preemption Wave I (1988 to 1991), the Florida legislature enacted a state preemption law barring local governments from enacting breed-specific laws. Jurisdictions with breed-specific ordinances at that time, such as Miami-Dade County, were grandfathered in, allowing them to keep their ordinance. Over 40 individuals have been killed by breeds of dogs most likely to be included in local breed-specific ordinances since the 1990 preemption law.

Florida 1990 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
1992 Orange County Randall Ayers 2 Pit bull
1994 Hillsborough County Amarillys Torres < 1 Rottweiler
1995 Marion County Kirby Lawrence 2 Rottweiler
1996 Duval County Anthony Hunt 4 Rottweiler
1996 Polk County Corey Hines 10 Rottweiler
1997 Washington County Jonathan Langford 7 Pit bull
1999 Citrus County Melissa Hunt 5 Pit bull
2000 Alachua County Quentin Wright 1 Pit bull
2000 Clay County Dallas Isham 1 Pit bull
2003 Hernando County Alfred Makuc 72 Pit bull
2003 Marion County Alice Broom 82 Pit bull
2004 Hillsborough County Anton Brown 8 Pit bull
2004 Orange County Myles Leakes 4 Pit bull
2006 Broward County Shawna Willey 30 Presa canario
2006 Osceola County John Brannaman 81 Pit bull
2007 Clay County Tina Canterbury 42 Pit bull
2007 Collier County Carshena Benjamin 71 Pit bull
2007 Volusia County Mary Bernal 63 Pit bull
2009 Pasco County Dallas Walters 1 Rottweiler
2010 Duval County Justin Valentin < 1 Pit bull
2010 Marion County Violet Haaker 3 American bulldog
2010 Pasco County Thomas Carter Jr. < 1 Pit bull
2011 Putnam County Roy McSweeney 74 Pit bull
2012 Duval County Dylan Andres 1 Rottweiler
2012 Miami-Dade Millicent Miller 82 American bulldog
2013 Bay County Tyler Jett 7 Pit bull
2014 Citrus County Christopher Camejo Jr. 2 Rottweiler
2014 Highlands County Jessica Norman 33 Pit bull
2014 Hillsborough County Logan Sheppard 4 Pit bull
2014 Levy County Joel Chirieleison 6 Pit bull
2014 Miami-Dade County Javon Dade, Jr. 4 Pit bull
2015 Hernando County Declan Moss 1 Pit bull
2015 Miami-Dade County Carmen Reigada 91 American bulldog
2015 Miami-Dade County Nyjah Espinosa 1 American bulldog
2016 Duval County Michael Downing 83 Rottweiler
2016 Lake County Sonda Tyson 66 Pit bull
2016 Miami-Dade County Manuel Mejia 49 American bulldog
2017 Calhoun County Alicia Malagon 76 Pit bull
2017 Palm Beach County Grace Walks 41 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Illinois

2003 preemption law

In 2003, between the two preemption waves (1997 to 2004), the Illinois legislature enacted a state preemption law barring many local governments from enacting breed-specific laws. The Illinois law, however, continues to operate untested in the legal area of "home rule," which trumps state preemption laws in that state. The following individuals have been mauled to death by breeds of dogs most likely to be included in local breed-specific ordinances since the 2003 legislation.

Illinois 2003 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
2003 Cook County Anna Cieslewicz 48 Pit bull
2005 Whiteside County Lydia Chaplin 14 Pit bull
2009 Clay County Rosie Humphreys 85 Pit bull
2009 Cook County Alex Angulo 4 Rottweiler
2009 Williamson County Gabrial Mandrell-Sauerhage 3 Pit bull
2010 Cook County Johnny Wilson 56 Pit bull
2010 Marshall County Jason Walter 7 Pit bull
2011 Winnebago County Tonia Parks 39 Pit bull
2012 Cook County Charles Hagerman 44 Pit bull
2012 Kane County Dawn Brown 44 Bullmastiff
2013 Cook County Jah’niyah White 2 Pit bull
2013 Knox County Ryan Maxwell 7 Pit bull
2014 McLean County Kara Hartrich 4 Pit bull
2015 Cook County James Nevils III 5 Pit bull
2017 Adams County Jamie Owsley 21 Pit bull
2017 Cook County Dorothy Ford 77 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Maine

1991 preemption law

In 1991, during Preemption Wave I (1988 to 1991), the Maine legislature enacted a state preemption law barring local governments from enacting breed-specific laws. The action followed an explosion of high profile pit bull attacks across the U.S. during the 1980s, followed by cities adopting breed bans. Maine has a population of 1.3 million and only three dog bite deaths since 2005; two were inflicted breeds of dogs most likely to be included in breed-specific ordinances.

Maine 1991 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
2011 Waldo County Annabelle Mitchell < 1 Rottweiler
2016 Penobscot County Hunter Bragg 7 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Massachusetts

2012 preemption law

In 2012, during Preemption Wave II (2012 to present) the Massachusetts legislature enacted a state preemption law prohibiting local governments from enacting or enforcing breed-specific laws, including Boston, which had a long standing Responsible Pit Bull Owner Act.2 In October 2017, over a dozen people watched in horror as a 7-year old boy was torn to pieces by two pit bulls in Lowell, which prior to the state preemption law had a breed-specific ordinance similar to Boston.3

Massachusetts 2012 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
2017 Middlesex County Javien Candelario 7 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Minnesota

1989 “likely” mixed-preemption law

In 1989, during Preemption Wave I (1988 to 1991), the Minnesota legislature enacted a mixed-preemption law preventing local governments from enacting breed-specific laws. The action followed an explosion of high profile pit bull attacks across the U.S. during the 1980s, followed by large and small cities adopting breed-specific laws. The northern state of Minnesota has a population of 5.5 million. The state has only incurred two dog bite fatalities since 2005.

Minnesota 1989 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
2007 Hennepin County Zachary King Jr 7 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Nevada

2013 “likely” mixed-preemption law

In 2013, at the beginning of Preemption Wave II (2012 to present), the Nevada legislature enacted a mixed-preemption law prohibiting local governments from enacting most breed-specific laws. Despite the newness of the state law, and the low population of the state (3 million), three people have already been killed by a dog breed most likely to be included in local breed-specific ordinances. Clark County is also one of 13 counties in the U.S. with the most dog bite fatalities.

Nevada 2013 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
2015 Nye County Kenneth Ford 79 Pit bull
2016 Clark County Derion Stevenson 9 Pit bull
2017 Clark County Kamiko Dao Tsuda-Saelee < 1 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

New Jersey

1989 preemption law

In 1989, during Preemption Wave I (1988 to 1991), the New Jersey legislature enacted a state preemption law preventing local governments from enacting or enforcing breed-specific laws. Attempts to repeal the state preemption law were made in 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2006 but none succeeded. New Jersey has long been known as a fighting dog "transport" state (trafficking and delivering). From 2005 to 2017, only two dog bite fatalities have been recorded in this state.

New Jersey 1989 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
2002 Bergen County Julia Mazziotto 80 Pit bull
2014 Passaic County Kenneth Santillan 13 Bullmastiff

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

New York

1997 preemption law

In 1997, between the two preemption waves (1997 to 2004), the New York legislature enacted a state preemption law barring local governments from enacting or enforcing breed-specific laws. The action came nearly 10 years after New York City banned pit bulls in 1989. The ban was lifted two years later.4 In February 2010, the New York City Housing Authority, the largest public housing authority in North America, banned pit bulls, rottweilers, doberman pinchers and their mixes.

New York 1997 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
1997 Queens (NYC) Salvatore Biagini 70 Pit bull
2003 Westchester County Bonnie Page 75 Pit bull
2006 Rockland County Jeannine Fusco 44 Pit bull
2007 Steuben County Saben Jones-Abbott 6 Pit bull
2008 Brooklyn (NYC) Andrew Stein < 1 Doberman pinscher
2008 Staten Island (NYC) Henry Piotrowski 90 Pit bull
2011 Brooklyn (NYC) Jayelin Graham 4 Cane corso
2015 Monroe County Anthony Wind 26 Rottweiler
2015 Nassau County Amiyah Dunston 9 Pit bull
2015 Oneida County Carter Hartle < 1 Pit bull
2016 Staten Island (NYC) Daisie Bradshaw 68 Pit bull
2017 Queens (NYC) Louise Hermida 75 Mastiff

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Ohio

1987 to 2012 statewide pit bull law

In July 1987, Ohio became the first state to enact a statewide pit bull law. The law declared pit bulls "vicious" and required owners to carry liability insurance, house the dog in a locked enclosure while on property and no longer than a 6 foot leash when off-property. The law was repealed 25 years later. Pit bull-type dogs killed six people during the 2.5 decade period of the state law. Since the repeal in February 2012, ten people have been killed by dogs formerly regulated by the state.

Ohio May 2012 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Formerly Subject to State Law
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
July 1987 - statewide pit bull law enacted requiring insurance and secure enclosure
1987 Franklin County Shannon Tucker 2 Pit bull
1988 Stark County Amber Haverstock < 1 Pit bull
1992 Cuyahoga County Angela Kaplan 28 Pit bull
2000 Geauga County Josiah Holden 5 Pit bull
2005 Cuyahoga County Ernie Assad 82 Pit bull
2010 Lorain County Michael Winters 30 Pit bull
February 2012 - statewide pit bull law repealed 25 years later (effect date May 2012)
2012 Allen County Makayla Darnell < 1 Pit bull
2012 Hamilton County Ronnell Brown 40 Pit bull-type
2012 Montgomery County Dawn Jurgens 76 Cane corso
2014 Montgomery County Klonda Richey 57 Pit bull-type
2014 Montgomery County Johnathan Quarles, Jr. < 1 Pit bull
2014 Butler County Cindy Whisman 59 Pit bull
2015 Cuyahoga County Annie Williams 71 Pit bull
2017 Montgomery County Maurice Brown 60 Pit bull
2017 Seneca County Michael Parks 60 Pit bull
2017 Knox County Barrett Hagans < 1 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Oklahoma

1991 “likely” mixed-preemption law

In 1991, during Preemption Wave I (1988 to 1991), the Oklahoma legislature enacted a mixed-preemption law preventing local governments from enacting most breed-specific laws. The action followed the pit bull mauling deaths of two children in 1987 and 1988. From 2005 to 2017, Oklahoma ranked as the number 7th state in the U.S. for the rate of dog mauling fatalities (per population of 10 million). Oklahoma has over twice the death rate as the national average.

Oklahoma 1991 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
1994 Oklahoma County Sonjya Mars 1 Rottweiler
1994 Oklahoma County Johnny Ray Miller 3 Rottweiler
1994 Tulsa County Gerlessa Russell 4 Rottweiler
1999 Tulsa County Darrel Roberson 42 Rottweiler
2005 Washington County Cody Adair 4 Pit bull
2007 Pontotoc County Rosalie Bivins 65 Pit bull
2010 Payne County Justin Lopez < 1 Rottweiler
2011 Carter County Virgil Cantrell 50 Pit bull
2012 Bryan County James Hurst 92 Pit bull
2012 Oklahoma County Nellie Davis 61 Pit bull
2015 Comanche County Jordan Collins-Tyson 3 Pit bull
2015 Oklahoma County Edgar Brown 60 Pit bull
2015 Wagoner Carolyn Lamp 67 Pit bull
2017 Oklahoma County Cecille Short 82 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Pennsylvania

1990 preemption law

In 1990, during Preemption Wave I (1988 to 1991), the Pennsylvania legislature enacted a preemption law barring local governments from enacting breed-specific laws. The action followed an explosion of high profile pit bull attacks across the U.S. during the 1980s, followed by cities adopting breed-specific laws. The following individuals have been mauled to death by breeds of dogs most likely to be included in local breed-specific ordinances since the 1990 legislation.

Pennsylvania 1990 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
1995 Fayette County Robert Thorpe 11 Rottweiler
2003 Clarion County Lily Krajewski 2 Rottweiler
2009 Beaver County Brianna Shanor 8 Rottweiler
2010 Philadelphia County Christine Staab 37 Pit bull
2011 Philadelphia County Carmen Ramos 50 Pit bull
2015 Allegheny County Taylynn DeVaughn 2 Pit bull
2017 Lehigh County Lisa Green 32 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

South Carolina

1988 mixed-preemption law

In 1988, during Preemption Wave I (1988 to 1991), the South Carolina legislature enacted a mixed-preemption law preventing local governments from enacting most types of breed-specific laws. For instance, in 2015, Beaufort County legally adopted a mandatory pit bull sterilization law. The following individuals have been killed by breeds of dogs most likely to be included in prima facie ordinances (breeds declared "dangerous" or "vicious") since the passage of the 1988 law.

South Carolina 1988 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
1990 Oconee County Jason Wilson 5 Pit bull
1991 Chester County Raymond Gosh 86 Rottweiler
1992 Greenville County Jonathon Williams 7 Rottweiler
1993 Richland County Louise Gantt 65 Rottweiler
1999 Fairfield County John Mickle 46 Pit bull
2004 Spartanburg County Isaiah Smith 1 Pit bull
2005 Spartanburg County Asia Turner 4 Rottweiler
2006 Bamberg County Allen Young 1 Pit bull
2006 Dillion County John Matthew Davis 10 Pit bull
2007 Dorchester County Brian Palmer 1 Pit bull
2007 Dorchester County Holden Jernigan 2 Pit bull
2010 Dillion County Justin Lane 25 Pit bull
2010 Lee County Ethel Horton 65 Pit bull
2011 Dillion County Sirlinda Hayes 66 Rottweiler
2013 Dorchester County Carlton Freeman 80 Pit bull
2013 Florence County Arianna Merrbach 5 Pit bull
2013 Greenwood County Betty Todd 65 Pit bull
2015 Spartanburg County Nicole Cartee 25 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Texas

1991 “likely” mixed-preemption law

In 1991, during Preemption Wave I (1988 to 1991), the Texas legislature enacted a mixed-preemption law preventing local governments from enacting and enforcing breed-specific laws. The action followed the mauling deaths of nine children and one adult -- all killed by pit bulls -- in Texas from 1981 to 1990. Since this time, over 55 Texans have been brutally killed by breeds of dogs most likely to be included in local breed-specific ordinances since the 1991 legislation.

Texas 1991 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
1993 Dallas County Dusty Patterson 5 Rottweiler
1997 Lampass County Cheryl Floyd 17 Rottweiler
1997 Lubbock County Aurora Gonzales 64 Pit bull
2000 Lubbock County Alva Rogers 82 Pit bull
2000 Smith County Ahleah Austin 3 Pit bull
2002 Harris County Dorothy Carter 52 Pit bull
2003 Harris County Fannie Pharms 58 Pit bull
2004 Montgomery County Baby "John Doe" < 1 Pit bull
2004 Nacogdoches County Jordan Parker < 1 Pit bull
2005 Bexar County Roberto Aguilera 64 Pit bull
2005 Harris County Sandra Sanchez 32 Rottweiler
2005 Milam County Lillian Stiles 76 Pit bull
2006 Childress County Ashton Scott < 1 Rottweiler
2006 Dickens County Frank Baber 49 Pit bull
2006 El Paso County Gemma Carlos 2 Rottweiler
2006 Harris County Pedro Rios 4 Pit bull
2006 Hidalgo County Mariah Puga 3 Pit bull
2006 Montgomery County David McCurry 41 Pit bull
2007 Bell County Seth Lovitt 11 Pit bull
2007 Bexar County Amber Jones 10 Pit bull
2007 Bexar County Celestino Rangel 90 Pit bull
2007 El Paso County Magdelena Silva 95 Doberman pinscher
2007 Dallas County Carolina Sotello 2 Pit bull
2007 Dallas County Scott Warren 6 Pit bull
2007 Galveston County Pamela Rushing 50 Pit bull-type
2008 Hidalgo County Pablo Lopez 5 Pit bull
2008 Stephens County Tanner Monk 7 Pit bull
2009 Bexar County Izaiah Cox < 1 Pit bull
2009 Caldwell County Tyson Miller 2 Pit bull
2009 Rusk County Justin Clinton 10 Pit bull
2009 Tarrant County Brooklynn Milburn 3 Rottweiler
2010 Harris County Jeannette Vaughn < 1 Rottweiler
2010 Rusk County Kaden Muckleroy 2 Pit bull
2011 Harris County Brayden McCollen < 1 Pit bull
2011 Cooke County Donna Conrad 71 Doberman pinscher
2011 Harris County Edna Dyson 71 Pit bull
2011 Randall County Mya Maeda < 1 Pit bull
2012 Montgomery County Jace Valdez 1 Pit bull
2012 Tarrant County Rayden Bruce < 1 Pit bull
2012 Victoria County Kylar Johnson 4 Pit bull
2013 Harris County Juan Campos 96 Pit bull
2013 Liberty County Linda Oliver 63 Rottweiler
2013 Montgomery County Christian Gormanous 4 Pit bull
2013 Uvalde County Isaiah Aguilar 2 Pit bull
2014 Bell County Je'vaeh Mayes 2 Pit bull
2014 Bell County Raymane Robinson Jr. 2 Bullmastiff
2014 Bexar County Petra Aguirre 83 Pit bull
2014 Comal County Betty Clark 75 Pit bull
2014 Harris County Christina Bell (Burleson) 43 Pit bull
2014 Kaufman County Dorothy Hamilton 85 Pit bull
2014 Nueces County Rita Woodard 64 Pit bull
2015 Dallas County Brayden Wilson < 1 Pit bull
2015 Hopkins County Betty Wood 78 Rottweiler
2015 Orange County Tanner Smith 5 Pit bull
2015 Reeves County Norberto Legardo 83 Pit bull
2016 Dallas County Antoinette Brown 52 Pit bull
2017 El Paso County Jacob Brooks 4 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

Virginia

1993 “likely” mixed-preemption law

Between 1990 and 1993, at the end of Preemption Wave I (1988 to 1991), the Virginia legislature enacted a mixed-preemption law barring local governments from enacting breed-specific laws. The action followed an explosion of high profile pit bull attacks across the U.S. during the 1980s, followed by cities adopting breed-specific laws. The following Virginians have been killed by dog breeds most likely to be included in local breed-specific ordinances since the 1990s legislation.

Virginia 1993 to 2017 - Deaths by Dog Breeds Most Often Subject to BSL
Death Year Location Name Age Dog Breed
2005 Orange County Robert Schafer 4 Rottweiler
2005 Spotsylvania County Dorothy Sullivan 82 Pit bull
2005 Suffolk (independent city) Jonathan Martin 2 Pit bull
2007 Richmond County Matthew Johnson 6 Rottweiler
2009 Loudoun County Carter Delaney 20 Pit bull
2009 Orange County Jasmine Deane 1 Pit bull
2011 Chesterfield County Salvador Cotto < 1 Pit bull
2011 Spotsylvania County David Haigler 38 Pit bull
2016 Grayson County Payton Sawyers 1 Pit bull
2017 Goochland County Bethany Stephens 22 Pit bull
2017 Virginia Beach (independent city) Margaret Colvin 91 Pit bull

Clicking on Death Year leads to a larger archive of fatal dog maulings including that specific victim. The Dog Breed column indicates that at least one dog of this breed was involved in the attack that resulted in a human fatality.

  1. As early as 1983, when fatal attacks inflicted by wolf-dog hybrids had just begun, the Connecticut legislature banned the possession of "potentially dangerous animals," including wolf-dog hybrids. (This 1994 legislation refers back to the 1983 "potentially dangerous animals" act.)
  2. In 1994, when fatal attacks inflicted by wolf-dog hybrids had risen to a national alarm level, the Massachusetts legislature banned the possession of wolf-dog hybrids.
  3. Jurisdictions in Massachusetts that lost their pit bull ordinances when the state legislature passed the preemption bill include: Amesbury, Boston, Canton, Everett, Haverhill, Lowell, Lynn, Medway, Rockland, Whitman, Winthrop and Worcester.
  4. New York Will Ban New Pit Bulls After Oct. 1 and Restrict Others, by Arnold Lubasch, The New York Times, March 28, 1989 (nytimes.com) and New York Acts to Lift Pit Bull Controls, by Alessandra Stanley, The New York Times, March 12, 1991 (nytimes.com)